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Saving Celosia Seeds

Hi Lovelies,

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I saved the seeds from this plant. I really liked the bicolor pinks, so it will be interesting to see if I can get more plants with this color – fingers crossed.

This post is a little late, but don’t worry – I didn’t forget! I’m still knee-deep in cleaning up this season’s mess, and now that it’s colder, I’m a lot less motivated to even walk outside. It’s usually at this point in the game that I start wondering why I don’t live in California or some place that I can grow enormous groves of citrus trees. We hit a huge milestone over on Instagram last night, in case you don’t follow along – we reached 10,000 followers. This fact is amazing in so many ways. I can only say, “thank you” but if you multiply that times like 1000, you may be a little more accurate. If you haven’t checked out the feed over there, please feel free to do so. If you use the hashtag #lovelocalflowers, I’ll see your photos as well. It’s all about sharing the gorgeousness that’s growing in your yard! I love it!

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This is the underside/base of the celosia flower head. See how it’s getting weak and starting to dry out? Those little black spots are the seeds. Each little “chamber” holds one seed.

Okay, onto the task at hand. Saving celosia seeds is super easy. In fact, I almost didn’t even write this. Basically, I let the celosia grow. Then around the time that the flower head starts to droop, or when it starts to look “dirty”, I’ll check it by just running my thumb along the underside of the bloom. Black seeds will easily fall out if it’s ready. If they’re a little difficult to remove I’ll let them hangout on the plant a few more weeks.

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Clearly I’ve let these flowers go too far and they’re dropping seeds all over the yard. One seed package has been giving me volunteers for years.

In my zone 6b, celosia reseed very easily. I planted a package two years ago and I still have celosia all over my yard. As an alternative to rubbing the seeds out with my hands, I’ve also tried shaking the heads over a bucket – which worked equally well for getting more than just a package-worth.

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Here’s a close up of the seeds, ready for planting!

That’s about it! Is there something you want to know about? Suggest it in the comments, and I’ll give it my best. Hope you’re having a wonderful day, much love!

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An awesome one-woman flower farm, cultivated by the love of all things pretty.

3 Comments

  • 15yearsandcountingdream

    I just love your site. So much information. I do have a question about puncture vine. We live on 7 acres and didn’t have a problem with puncture vine (Or goats heads) until about 3-4 years ago. Now it is out of control. I have been painstakingly trying to pull it all out, but no success. Today I saw an organic add for “puncture vine weevils.” Do you know anything about those? I am also going to check with our WSU Extension office. I could spend all day on your site. Thanks for having such wonderful information, and sharing it.

    • freshcutky

      Oh man! Don’t you hate those invasive things that just come out of no where. I had to do a quick Google because I wasn’t sure what it looked like. Unfortunately, I have no idea about it since I’ve never seen it here (and hope I don’t, lol). I did notice, however, that there are a few states that have it listed as a “noxious weed”. Please do let me know what you find out! My main struggle in my garden is bindweed. It grows and trys to choke out EVERYTHING! It makes me crazy! 🙂 🙂 Good Luck!!! Tons more info to come 🙂 🙂 🙂

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