Growing Bachelor’s Buttons from Seed – Hardy Annual Flower Favorites

Bachelor’s buttons will always be among one of my top five absolute favorite flowers. Now, I do realize that might sound a little odd. The plants don’t exactly have the show-stopping power of the likes of hydrangeas or roses – so what makes them so special? They’re easy! That’s right, bachelor buttons were among the first few types of flowers that I ever grew and are definitely part of the reason that I’m still growing flowers.I personally think that direct sowing bachelor’s button seeds is the choice to make. However, they’re more than happy being started indoors and then transplanted outside. They really aren’t very fussy at all. These beauties also germinate and grow quite well with the use of the winter sowing method.

Bachelor’s Buttons are cool season, hardy annual flowers. This means that they’re surprisingly tolerant of cold weather. In fact, they’re able to survive the winter here in my zone 6b/7 garden quite easily.

Seeds can be sown in either spring or fall – I prefer to plant in both. Seeds sown around the end of September will germinate, begin to grow, and then over winter as small seedlings. The seedlings will resume growth and bloom when the weather begins to warm in the spring. If you’re concerned that your winter weather is a little too harsh for the plants to survive, there’s always the option to protect the seedlings with something like a frost blanket, or to simply wait to plant until the soil can be worked in the spring.

Plants grown from a direct seeding in the fall seem to grow much larger in my garden. Spring plants still grow quite well, however, they usually grow to only about have the size of their fall counterparts. I can only imagine this is because the spring time temperatures in my garden warm so quickly. Gardeners with milder spring time temperatures may have better luck.

Aside from planting, these lovely blooms don’t seem to require much work. I’ve never noticed any problems with bugs, aside from the occasional aphid – which can be easily removed with water.

Tall plants from fall sowing may benefit from the use of horizontal trellis netting. Since these plants will often reach 3 to 4 feet tall, it’s not uncommon for them to be blown to the ground during an early spring severe thunderstorm.Overall, I think these are an absolutely great addition to the flower garden for both beginners and professional, alike. I’d love to hear all about your experiences growing bachelor’s buttons in comments below!

Hope you’re having a wonderful day!

This is what happens when you try to pretend that you’re a REAL flower farmer.

 

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2 thoughts on “Growing Bachelor’s Buttons from Seed – Hardy Annual Flower Favorites

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