Digging and Dividing Daffodil Bulbs – Growing Flowers – Cut Flower Farm

Today, I’m finally getting around to doing a garden task that I’ve been putting off for a long time. That means I’m digging the daffodil bulbs up and dividing them. I’ve been ignoring this task for a long time, because I’ve simply not felt like doing it. I’ve actually not felt like doing a lot of things – depression is weird like that.

Anyhow, the first thing I needed to do is start digging. These bulbs were actually A LOT deeper than I thought they would be. If you look at the picture above, you can see that little white stem sticking out in the middle – that’s the daffodil. I should also mention that I started this process around the first week of October. I’m honestly not sure whether it’s the right time, but I think it makes sense. After all, I’m probably just going to replant them somewhere else next week.

As I started to dig around the daffodil bulbs, they were very obviously coming out of the ground in huge clumps. These are the clumps that I’ll be dividing before planting again. The main reason I decided to dig the daffodils was because they seemed to be flowering less and less. Hopefully, removing the bulbs and spacing them more will inspire them to make more flowers. I’m not quite sure. Who knows?

 

If you’re digging and dividing daffodils, always make sure to do a little research first. Keep them away from your kids and pets (and whoever else). The bulbs do contain some toxins that irritate the skin, so you’ll definitely want to put some gloves on. Safety first!

After I had managed to get as many bulb clumps as possible out of the ground, I left them outside for a couple days in the sun to let them dry out a little bit. As you can tell from the pictures, my soil is extremely heavy clay. It definitely needed to dry before I attempted to separate the flower bulbs.

 

Physically separating the bulbs seemed to go against my better judgment. However, I know that the ultimate end result will be even more beautiful daffodil flowers than I started with. Besides, the daffodils needed to be moved before I can built my hoophouse for winter. There’s definitely a post about that coming sometime soon. 

That’s it! Once the bulbs were separated, I simply replanted them. I hope that this post was helpful, though I’m not quite sure that it was. I would love to hear all about your experiences growing daffodils in the comments below. I hope you’re having a great day!

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