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How to Grow Zinnias from Seed

Zinnias are one of my absolute favorite flowers in the cut flower garden. When it comes to how to grow zinnias from seed, it’s pretty easy. Here in my yard, the zinnia flowers love my hot and humid weather. It’s not uncommon for them to reach heights of 6ft, and to stretch taller than my privacy fence. If you’re attempting to grow zinnias for the first time, you have a couple choices regarding when and how to start the seeds.

The easiest way to start zinnias from seed is to direct sow them into the garden bed. First, you’ll need to wait until all chance of frost has passed. Amend the flower bed and make sure that it is free of weeds. Direct sunlight will also be really important. The zinnias that receive full sun in my yard are often twice the size of those that get partial shade.

The winter sowing method is another option for starting the seeds. Simply, growers use old milk jugs or clear bottles that act as miniature green houses. This allows even beginner gardeners to get a really create head start on the growing season without the use of grow lights or any special seed starting equipment. This method is especially cheap, as well.

I usually transplant the zinnia seedlings fairly close together – about 6 inches. Sometimes, planting closer can result in smaller plants and flowers. I find that zinnias are pretty forgiving just as long as the soil is nutrient dense.

I’m definitely not the only one who loves zinnia flowers. This time of year, there are so many pollinators in the garden – it’s amazing. Have you grown any zinnias before? I’d love to hear all about it in the comments below. Thank you for reading.

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An awesome one-woman flower farm, cultivated by the love of all things pretty.

One Comment

  • Celia H. Mance

    Your flowers are beautiful and I enjoy reading your descriptions. When I was a child I remember my grandmother having zinnias in every shade of pink and coral. I am retired now and am having fun trying to recreate my grandmother’s beautiful flower garden.

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