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Growing Zinderella Zinnias in the Cut Flower Garden

It’s not exactly a secret that I love to grow zinnias. They’re easy to plant, and even easier to grow. They’ll bloom without abandon until the first frost finally brings them to an end. Of all the different zinnias that I’ve grown, Zinderella zinnias are one of the most frustrating. The process of growing them is the same as growing other cultivars, but I’ve definitely found that the results can vary drastically. 

Zinderella zinnias are different because of their scabiosa type flowers. Rather than having the shape of regular zinnias, the petals tend to mound up in a big pile of ruffles. These look so amazing in cut flower arrangements, and their unique shapes make them a little more interesting than the classic zinnia. Of course, that’s subjective. My mom actually really dislikes the look of these.

I grew two different varieties this year – zinderalla lilac and zinderella peach. Though this year they’ve introduced quite a few new zinderella colors – red, orange, purple, and white.  Perhaps,  I’ll  add  those  next  year.

In the photo above, you’ll see the frustrating part. Their scabiosa habit isn’t reliable. Online, you’ll see beautiful photos of people holding armloads of these blooms. Honestly, I’m skeptical of their integrity. After all it would be quite easy to pick the “goods ones” for a photo-op. That’s just my nature. I don’t tend to trust people.

I’ve heard the reasoning behind this be attributed to hot weather or to stress. The zinderellas were disappointing, even when the temperatures were in the 70s. In this season’s garden, I can’t believe that the plants are stressed, as they reached the height of my 6ft privacy fence. Regardless of my skepticism and complaining, I do really love when the blooms look as they should. I think they’re worth having in the cut flower garden. However, it’s also important to remain realistic in what you should expect.

Have you grown these before? I’d love to hear all about your experience in the comments below! Thank you so much for reading.

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An awesome one-woman flower farm, cultivated by the love of all things pretty.

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