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  • Sowing Biennial Flower Seeds into Trays for the Cut Flower Garden

      When I talk about sowing biennial flowers, I will be the first to admit that I use the term “biennial” very loosely. In general, the term biennial should be used to refer to plants that take two seasons to grow and bloom. However, I tend to call things “biennial” when they may be truly perennial. Either way, of all the seeds I’m planting into trays today – I treat them the same. I sow the seeds around the middle of August, then transplant them into the garden around the first week of October. They then overwinter and bloom the following year. I wish I could be more helpful in…

  • How to Grow Zinnias from Seed

    Zinnias are one of my absolute favorite flowers in the cut flower garden. When it comes to how to grow zinnias from seed, it’s pretty easy. Here in my yard, the zinnia flowers love my hot and humid weather. It’s not uncommon for them to reach heights of 6ft, and to stretch taller than my privacy fence. If you’re attempting to grow zinnias for the first time, you have a couple choices regarding when and how to start the seeds. The easiest way to start zinnias from seed is to direct sow them into the garden bed. First, you’ll need to wait until all chance of frost has passed. Amend…

  • How to Grow Larkspur from Seed – Cut Flower Gardening for Beginners

    Larkspur always have a special place in my garden. It’s not that I have fond memories of them or anything – it’s that they’re one of the first hardy annual flowers that I was able to successfully grow. With their carefree habit, they’re super easy to sow and to use as cut flowers. As always, make sure to do your research before planting. Larkspur are toxic, so make certain to keep your kids and pets (and everyone else) safe while in the cut flower garden. This year, the garden was a little bit out of control. Yes, that’s a huge pumpkin vine crawling into the middle of the larkspur patch.…

  • In Bloom: Love-in-a-Mist Nigella – Cut Flower Gardening for Beginners

    One of my absolute favorite parts about growing flowers is getting to try different varieties. Love in a mist, or nigella, flowers aren’t a particular new addition to my cut flower garden. However, I did plant a couple new-to-me cultivars last fall. Check out some of the pictures I was able to take – These white flowers with the bluish streaks are the variety called ‘Delft Blue’. Delft blue nigella is one of the first varieties that I ever grew. I love how unique their patterns are. I also really like actual structure of the flower. As these flowers get older and older, they begin to develop some pretty gnarly…

  • Larkspur and Feverfew Cut Flower Arrangement – Cut Flower Garden

    Some days, I feel completely defeated when it comes to flower “farming”. By the time summer finally arrives, it’s a constant battle with the weeds and with the mosquitoes. Emphasis on the mosquitoes. When I headed out into the garden this particular day, I knew that I was in for a race against the rain. Unfortunately, the rain started pouring almost as soon as I snipped the first flower stem.  This arrangement started with a base of double feverfew flowers. These are seriously so easy to grow. Their spray growth habit make them a really great choice for quickly filling up a vase, too. I always look forward to these…

  • Growing Canterbury Bells Flowers from Seed – Cut Flower Garden

    This year, one of my main goals was to grow as many new-to-me flowers as possible. Last year, I had accidentally grown one canterbury bells plant. So, I wanted to make sure to grow multiple (on purpose) this time around. Since these plants are biennial (blooming the second year), I began the process of seed sowing around the end of September. Here in Kentucky, zone 6b/7, these plants will overwinter without issue or protection. Sowing the seeds is also a simple process. All I did to start the seeds was fill a seed tray with moist potting mix. I then surface sowed the seeds and left them in a warm…

  • Growing Sweet Peas from Seed – Cut Flower Garden

    This definitely isn’t the first time that I’ve found myself writing about sweet peas. In fact, the process of learning to best grow these beautiful flowers where I live has been quite the journey. Before we start, I should state that this post is about ornamental sweet peas. This kind is toxic. I always clarify this since there can definitely be confusion where I live. My sweet pea growing journey began last fall, around the end of September. Here in Kentucky (zone 6b/7), sweet peas can be planted in the fall and over wintered for healthy spring blooms. Though growing these plants under cover is the best option, I have…

  • Growing Annual Phlox; Another Try.

    When it comes to gardening, and everything else, I can be pretty stubborn. I’ve tried growing annual phlox a couple times, and both times the results were disappointing. However, this year, I was much closer to success! Just as I had done in previous years, I used the winter sowing method to start the seeds. After getting great germination, I transplanted them into the garden as soon as the soil could be worked. Since our winter was a little drier than normal, I was able to put the plants out around the middle of March. This allowed for plenty of time for the plants to become established in the cool…

  • Canterbury Bell Cut Flower Arrangement – Cut Flower Garden

    With many of the hardy annual flowers starting to finish up blooming, I’m continually surprised by how many bright pink flowers that I planted into the yard last fall. I think I may have been worried about the garden “matching”, because I went all-out for the pinks. The canterbury bells are no exception to my “pink flowers only” rule, as they have now started to show. There’s a very subtle difference in the pink color of the chantilly snapdragons and the canterbury bells. The bells are definitely a couple shades darker, which I think, makes for a really nice contrast in the flower arrangements. For this one, I decided that…

  • Transplanting Sunflowers in the Garden – Growing Sunflowers for Cut Flowers

    If you’ve been following along for a while, you’ll likely remember when we started the process of winter sowing our sunflower seeds. Transplanting sunflowers – it’s finally that time! This year, I’m growing several different varieties of sunflowers – those which are open pollinated, and those which will be used for cut flower arrangements. Today, I’ll be transplanting these Pro Cut Brilliance and Pro Cut Gold pollenless sunflowers. These flowers are great for cut flowers in that they don’t produce any yellow pollen. This will prevent pollen drop in cut flower arrangements. Since there is no pollen, these flowers will not produce any seed unless cross pollinated by some other…