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Tag: hardy annual flowers

Growing Snapdragons from Seed – Cut Flower Farm

Growing Snapdragons from Seed – Cut Flower Farm

CHECK OUT OUR SOAP SUBSCRIPTION AND 50% OFF SALE! CLICK HERE! I’ve had a long and troubled relationship with snapdragons. Snapdragons have always been one of those flowers that just wouldn’t grow the way I wanted. I’ve seen those “real” flower farms, with rows and […]

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Pansies in the Garden for Super Cute Jar Posies – Cut Flower Arrangement

Pansies in the Garden for Super Cute Jar Posies – Cut Flower Arrangement

So, I’ll admit – I didn’t know what to call this post. For some reason, calling something “super cute” doesn’t seem like the most professional thing to do – but then again, I’m not a professional. That means these pansies are officially being classified as […]

Growing Bachelor’s Buttons from Seed – Hardy Annual Flower Favorites – Growing Flowers from Seed – Gardening for Beginners

Growing Bachelor’s Buttons from Seed – Hardy Annual Flower Favorites – Growing Flowers from Seed – Gardening for Beginners

Bachelor’s buttons will always be among one of my top five absolute favorite flowers. Now, I do realize that might sound a little odd. The plants don’t exactly have the show-stopping power of the likes of hydrangeas or roses – so what makes them so special? They’re easy! That’s right, bachelor buttons were among the first few types of flowers that I ever grew and are definitely part of the reason that I’m still growing flowers.I personally think that direct sowing bachelor’s button seeds is the choice to make. However, they’re more than happy being started indoors and then transplanted outside. They really aren’t very fussy at all. These beauties also germinate and grow quite well with the use of the winter sowing method.

Bachelor’s Buttons are cool season, hardy annual flowers. This means that they’re surprisingly tolerant of cold weather. In fact, they’re able to survive the winter here in my zone 6b/7 garden quite easily.

Seeds can be sown in either spring or fall – I prefer to plant in both. Seeds sown around the end of September will germinate, begin to grow, and then over winter as small seedlings. The seedlings will resume growth and bloom when the weather begins to warm in the spring. If you’re concerned that your winter weather is a little too harsh for the plants to survive, there’s always the option to protect the seedlings with something like a frost blanket, or to simply wait to plant until the soil can be worked in the spring.

Plants grown from a direct seeding in the fall seem to grow much larger in my garden. Spring plants still grow quite well, however, they usually grow to only about have the size of their fall counterparts. I can only imagine this is because the spring time temperatures in my garden warm so quickly. Gardeners with milder spring time temperatures may have better luck.

Aside from planting, these lovely blooms don’t seem to require much work. I’ve never noticed any problems with bugs, aside from the occasional aphid – which can be easily removed with water.

Tall plants from fall sowing may benefit from the use of horizontal trellis netting. Since these plants will often reach 3 to 4 feet tall, it’s not uncommon for them to be blown to the ground during an early spring severe thunderstorm.Overall, I think these are an absolutely great addition to the flower garden for both beginners and professional, alike. I’d love to hear all about your experiences growing bachelor’s buttons in comments below!

 

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Favorite Bachelor’s Buttons Seeds (Affiliate Links) – 

‘Blue Boy’ Bachelor’s Buttons

‘Black Magic’ Bachelor’s Buttons

‘Tall Blend’ Bachelor’s Buttons

‘Classic Romantic’ Bachelor’s Buttons

Hope you’re having a wonderful day!

This is what happens when you try to pretend that you’re a REAL flower farmer.

 

 

Flower Garden Update – Week One – April 2018

Flower Garden Update – Week One – April 2018

I’ve always wanted to make weekly updates, but I’ll admit, I always forget about them and fail to keep up with progress. Now that I’m actively trying to get into a better blogging routine, I’ll hopefully be able to maintain a better schedule. Let’s see […]

Growing Lathyrus Odoratus (Sweet Peas) in Zone 6b/7

Growing Lathyrus Odoratus (Sweet Peas) in Zone 6b/7

Hi Lovelies! I’m back with another growing tutorial!  Want to see the post with photos and videos in it’s entirety? Click here! Hooray!  Sweet peas (not the edible kind) are gorgeous and smell absolutely divine! Unfortunately, however, they can be somewhat difficult to grow depending […]

How to Grow Love-in-a-Mist in Zone 6b/7 – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening

How to Grow Love-in-a-Mist in Zone 6b/7 – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening

Hi Lovelies,

The love-in-a-mist flowers are finishing blooming in the garden, so I thought we’d take a look at my experience growing these unique flowers!

NAME: Love-in-a-Mist (Nigella)

TOXIC: YES. Always do your research and be responsible any time you add something new to the garden. Be aware of what you’re growing around kids, pets, and everyone else. Many ornamental plants and cut flowers are toxic. Use common sense, always wear gloves, wash hands, don’t touch your eyes or face, etc. Safety first! Before planting, ensure that plants are not considered invasive in your area. 

HOW: Easy to direct sow. Easy to germinate using the winter sowing method. Broadcasting seed onto prepared flower beds.

WHEN: In my garden, the best results come from seeds that were direct sown in fall (at the end of September in my garden). The seeds germinate and seedlings survive the winter. Overwintering of seedlings seems to vary greatly. One variety survived without much loss, but another variety completely died and did not make it through the winter. Obviously, results will vary from garden to garden. Overall, I had a decent success rate.  My seedlings survived a few nights down to 8F, with little damage.  They were also briefly covered in snow.

Direct sowing the seeds in the spring as soon as soil can be worked is also an option.  The resulting plants from a spring planting were much smaller, but the stems were still usable for bouquets. I imagine that people who live in cooler climates might be able to even succession sow these seeds for a longer bloom time, but I don’t think it would be very effective in my garden.

Love-in-a-Mist appear to germinate best when temperatures are cool. While I’m not sure if they require a period of cold before germination, this requirement would naturally be met when planted in the fall. The seeds also respond well to use of the winter sowing method. This year, I plan on trying to grow love-in-a-mist as a biennial in hopes of bigger plants and more blooms next spring.

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How to Grow Larkspur in Zone 6b/7 – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening

How to Grow Larkspur in Zone 6b/7 – Ornamental Cut Flower Gardening

Hi Lovelies, I’m back! With the weather finally warming up, that means we’ve got even more plants coming into bloom! Today we’ll be taking a look at larkspur. Here in my zone, larkspur can sometimes be a little bit tricky. Here are some of the […]

In the Garden: ‘Classic Romantic Mix’ Bachelor Buttons

In the Garden: ‘Classic Romantic Mix’ Bachelor Buttons

Hi Lovelies, I’ve been doing a terrible job keeping up with posts and comment replies, and in the midst of planting season, I’m not sure if I’ve been getting as much sleep as I should be getting. Anyhow, in my quest to try to post […]

Hardy Annual Seedling Update

Hardy Annual Seedling Update

 

 

Hi Lovelies,

Today I thought I would share some photos of the hardy annuals that are currently in the garden. Whenever I grow something new, one of the first things that I do when I see sprouts in my garden beds is “google” whether or not the plant that’s growing is in fact what I planted or if it’s a random lawn weed. I’d be lying if I said that I had a stellar record when it comes to pulling weeds, but I still like to know the difference!  These seeds were all planted on September 20th. Feel free to comment below! Much love!

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Scabiosa looking mighty fine!
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Shirley poppies, as you can see – I also do a terrible job at thinning!
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These are nigella (love-in-a-mist). They look a lot like larkspur at this point, but you’ll notice more of a difference once they get bigger.
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Agrostemma (corncockle) with weeds all over the place.
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Ranunculus, looking pretty without a weed to be found. Lol!
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Anemones have loved this wet fall weather, already so big!
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I honestly don’t know what these are – we’ll find out in time. The only reason I know they aren’t weeds is because I clumsily sowed them in a huge grouping.
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A huge mass of laceflower, so cute.
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Sweet peas falling all over the place. I’m crossing my fingers for these to make it through the winter.
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Ornamental kale, another experiment.
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Fragrant mignonette.
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Tons of larkspur this season!
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Calendula!
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Old reliable – aka Bachelor’s Buttons (cornflowers)

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