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  • Growing Love in a Mist Nigella in the Cut Flower Garden

    When I first started learning to grow flowers, there were a lot of plants that I had never seen before in real life. In starting the cut flower patch I decided that I would try each type of flower at least once and then make a judgement whether I would continue growing them. I wasn’t really sure about love in a mist. Nothing about them really appealed to me. I mean, the colors were fine. However, I didn’t particularly think that I would like the shape of them. As it would turn out, I was wrong! Love in a mist is a hardy annual flower. That’s fancy talk that means…

  • How to Grow Larkspur from Seed – Cut Flower Gardening for Beginners

    Larkspur always have a special place in my garden. It’s not that I have fond memories of them or anything – it’s that they’re one of the first hardy annual flowers that I was able to successfully grow. With their carefree habit, they’re super easy to sow and to use as cut flowers. As always, make sure to do your research before planting. Larkspur are toxic, so make certain to keep your kids and pets (and everyone else) safe while in the cut flower garden. This year, the garden was a little bit out of control. Yes, that’s a huge pumpkin vine crawling into the middle of the larkspur patch.…

  • In Bloom: Love-in-a-Mist Nigella – Cut Flower Gardening for Beginners

    One of my absolute favorite parts about growing flowers is getting to try different varieties. Love in a mist, or nigella, flowers aren’t a particular new addition to my cut flower garden. However, I did plant a couple new-to-me cultivars last fall. Check out some of the pictures I was able to take – These white flowers with the bluish streaks are the variety called ‘Delft Blue’. Delft blue nigella is one of the first varieties that I ever grew. I love how unique their patterns are. I also really like actual structure of the flower. As these flowers get older and older, they begin to develop some pretty gnarly…

  • Larkspur and Feverfew Cut Flower Arrangement – Cut Flower Garden

    Some days, I feel completely defeated when it comes to flower “farming”. By the time summer finally arrives, it’s a constant battle with the weeds and with the mosquitoes. Emphasis on the mosquitoes. When I headed out into the garden this particular day, I knew that I was in for a race against the rain. Unfortunately, the rain started pouring almost as soon as I snipped the first flower stem.  This arrangement started with a base of double feverfew flowers. These are seriously so easy to grow. Their spray growth habit make them a really great choice for quickly filling up a vase, too. I always look forward to these…

  • Growing Sweet Peas from Seed – Cut Flower Garden

    This definitely isn’t the first time that I’ve found myself writing about sweet peas. In fact, the process of learning to best grow these beautiful flowers where I live has been quite the journey. Before we start, I should state that this post is about ornamental sweet peas. This kind is toxic. I always clarify this since there can definitely be confusion where I live. My sweet pea growing journey began last fall, around the end of September. Here in Kentucky (zone 6b/7), sweet peas can be planted in the fall and over wintered for healthy spring blooms. Though growing these plants under cover is the best option, I have…

  • Growing Annual Phlox; Another Try.

    When it comes to gardening, and everything else, I can be pretty stubborn. I’ve tried growing annual phlox a couple times, and both times the results were disappointing. However, this year, I was much closer to success! Just as I had done in previous years, I used the winter sowing method to start the seeds. After getting great germination, I transplanted them into the garden as soon as the soil could be worked. Since our winter was a little drier than normal, I was able to put the plants out around the middle of March. This allowed for plenty of time for the plants to become established in the cool…

  • Growing Icelandic Poppies for the First Time – Cut Flower Garden

    This year was a first for a lot of flowers in my yard. In that, this was the first time that I was finally able to successfully grow Icelandic poppies. In the past, I had attempted to grow them from seed. As it would turn out, those seeds were not prime and completely failed to germinate. This growing season, I decided that I would play it safe and order a plug tray full of seedlings. I chose the ‘Hummingbird Mix’ Icelandic poppies.  I transplanted the poppies into my unheated hoophouse at the end of October. Ideally, I would have liked to do it a little sooner, but we had a…

  • Mid February Hoop House Update – Growing Hardy Annual Flowers from Seed

    After quite a bit of cold weather, the mid February hoop house is looking a little rough. The plants have been covered with row cover for about two weeks straight, and are definitely starting to show signs of stress. Luckily, the weather is set to climb out of the teens and twenties. I’m really looking forward to some warmer temperatures inside the hoop. THAT’S IT FOR THIS POST. THANKS SO MUCH FOR READING. I TRULY APPRECIATE IT. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT THE BLOG OR MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL, BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THE FRESHCUTKY SOAP SHOP! THANKS SO MUCH!

  • Bachelor's Button Seeds

    Winter Sowing Bachelor’s Buttons Flowers in Zone 6b/7

    Winter sowing bachelor’s buttons seeds works like a charm. Then again, bachelor’s buttons seeds are so easy, I’m starting to think there are practically a million different ways that you can start these seeds. You can winter sow them, start them indoors or direct sow them – they all work. However, depending upon where you live, some methods definitely work better than others. Most commonly, I like to direct sow bachelor’s buttons seeds outdoors in the fall. Even though my garden gets plenty of cold weather and snow during the winter, bachelor’s buttons seedlings are usually not phased by the harsh conditions. This is one of the biggest reasons that…

  • Flower Garden Update – Week One – April 2018

    I’ve always wanted to make weekly updates, but I’ll admit, I always forget about them and fail to keep up with progress. Now that I’m actively trying to get into a better blogging routine, I’ll hopefully be able to maintain a better schedule. Let’s see what’s going on in the garden this week, shall we? Things in the garden are way behind. Seriously, behind. The weather has simply not been the best. It’s been cold and we’ve been getting tons of rain and snow. Nine inches of snow in March, actually. That’s definitely something that doesn’t normally happen here. We won’t mention the mud, either. THE MUD. EVERYTHING IS MUDDY.…