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Tag: herbs

January Hardy Annual Flowers and Hoophouse Update – Cut Flower Farm

January Hardy Annual Flowers and Hoophouse Update – Cut Flower Farm

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Large Scale Winter Sowing Experiment – Starting Flower and Vegetable Seeds Without Grow Lights

Large Scale Winter Sowing Experiment – Starting Flower and Vegetable Seeds Without Grow Lights

A few seasons ago, a brief introduction to the winter sowing method completely changed the way I garden. Without the need for grow lights or fancy seed starting setups, it is truly a way for those of us with tiny garden budgets to grow something […]

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Continuing the Winter Sowing Method – More Plantings for the Low Tunnel

Since my last post, my winter sowing has moved into full swing. This time of year, the process of starting all my flower seeds is such an exciting one. On one hand, I’m super eager to watch things start to grow. On the other, I’m always worried that absolutely nothing will grow and that things will be a complete failure. I guess that’s just my personality – either everything is great or everything is awful. Lol.

Today, I’m winter sowing some plants that I absolutely know will be successful. First to sow is bachelor’s buttons. I was able to find a packet of tall red bachelor’s buttons for just .99 cents – of course, I couldn’t resist. Bachelor’s buttons are an extremely cold tolerant annual flower in my garden. I usually plant these seeds in the fall and the bachelor button seedlings overwinter without protection, and then bloom in the following spring/early summer. On years that are exceptionally cold, I might lose some of the seedlings, but the rate at which these overwinter is usually pretty great. In fact, it is always one of the first hardy annual flowers that I suggest people try to grow.

I’m also sowing ‘Cherry Caramel’ phlox flowers again. I’ve grown phlox before in the past, and the more I learn about it – the more I’m beginning to think that I will need to grow these over winter in a low tunnel to get the best bloom possible. The good news for people with milder summer temperatures than me is that these annual phlox respond extremely well to the winter sowing method. It seems that the early season fluctuating temperatures really help with great germination rates. These packet from Baker Creek apparently has really crappy germination. It would have been nice to know that before I ordered them. Not to mention that was the rate from way back in April – but whatever. Hopefully, some of this packet will germinate. Who knows?

Statice is another of the more hardy annual flowers that does extremely well from the winter sowing method. In fact, the winter sowing method is the only way that I’ve ever germinated this seed. I tried making a fall planting this year, but the germination rate was absolutely terrible (even with cold treatment in the fridge). This tells me that they likely benefit from a combination of moisture and fluctuating temperatures that naturally happens with the winter sowing method. Anyhow, these are also super easy to transplant.

I also planted some spinach up in some cell trays. In general, spinach is not that great for starting in trays because their roots don’t really like to be disturbed. I find that growing each seed in their own cell makes the roots less likely to tangle and make transplant too difficult. Winter sowing spinach works great. This, in tandem with a direct sowing in the fall, will allow me to have spinach as long as possible (which isn’t very long) in my garden. Once the spring weather arrives, spinach season is practically over.

Gaillardia is another perennial flower that germinates really well when grown using the winter sowing method. For these, I always make sure to surface sow the seeds, as it seems that exposure to a little bit of light really seems to help get the highest germination rate possible. I can’t remember the name of the variety that I bought this year, but I do know that it’s a mix of double flowers. Hopefully, they’ll look really nice.

Last, but not least, I sowed some more herbs for the garden. This included some rosemary, sage, and even a little thyme. Winter sowing makes growing herbs from seed so insanely easy (at least here in my garden).

That’s really about it for this post! Thank you so much for taking the time to read it. I would love to hear all about what you’re growing in the comments below – have you ever used the winter sowing method before? What did you grow? I hope you’re having a great day!

Winter Sowing Results / End of April Garden Update – Cut Flowers and Vegetables

Winter Sowing Results / End of April Garden Update – Cut Flowers and Vegetables

Even though it’s still raining and I still haven’t had the opportunity to plant a lot of my leafy green vegetables, we’re quickly approaching the last frost date for my garden. Here, I generally use the date of May 5th as my frost-free date – […]

Growing Chamomile from Seed: Gardening for Beginners – Growing Flowers from Seed – Cut Flower Farm

Growing Chamomile from Seed: Gardening for Beginners – Growing Flowers from Seed – Cut Flower Farm

One of the really cool things about something like keeping a blog is that you don’t have to be organized. I mean, you kind of need to be organized – you have to plan ahead in regards to what pictures and video clips you absolutely […]

Winter Sowing Results Pt. 2 + Garden Update – Week 2 – April 2018

Winter Sowing Results Pt. 2 + Garden Update – Week 2 – April 2018

Finally! We finally had two days – count them, TWO – of beautiful weather. I’ll admit, I was beginning to lose patience and faith in the fact that I would ever be able to finally transplant my snapdragons and lettuce into the garden – but I got it done! Hooray! Just wanted to quickly check in on the progress of my winter sowing containers, as well as show you what’s blooming in the garden. Thanks so much! Hope you enjoy, and happy gardening!

Winter sown sweet peas are looking rough. They should have been transplanted last month!
These snapdragon seedlings look so great! I hope they bloom!
Seriously, look how big these seedlings are! Love it!
I was finally able to transplant the lettuce into the yard this week.
Strawflowers – you’ll notice some of my containers started to dry out. Yikes!
It’s either broccoli or cauliflower…
The name tags have washed off most of my containers. I don’t know what this is…
Only two little stock seedlings survived my dried out containers. Bummer.
Radicchio seedlings ready to be planted out into the garden.
These are either celery or celeriac.
I guess I’ll be able to tell the difference once they start growing, hopefully.
Onions and leeks – I can’t tell the difference. I’m thinking that the leeks are a darker green color.
Bupleurum for cut flower arrangements in the cutting garden. Hooray!
Swiss chard seedlings are ready to go into the garden, as well!
Dusty miller is so easy to grow using the winter sowing method! See the little grey leaves?
This year I’m growing seedlings in old shipping boxes. It’s not pretty, but so far – it works.
So many seedlings!
Oregano on the left. I’m not quite sure what’s growing on the right…
These johnny-jump-ups bloomed all winter long under a plastic low tunnel. I think they look adorable among the flowers.
Whoa! These ‘Mr. Fokker’ anemones are a show-stopper in the cutting garden.
I planted my rudbeckia seeds in a pizza box – I’ll let you know how it turns out. Lol!
The chives that I planted last year will be blooming soon. I think chive blossoms are so pretty.
Another picture of the anemones – the blue color!
The chrysanthemum cuttings from King’s Mums came in the mail this week, too!

 

Winter Sowing Results Pt 2 – Cut Flower and Vegetable Seedlings

Winter Sowing Results Pt 2 – Cut Flower and Vegetable Seedlings

If you’ve been following my YouTube channel at all, you know that I’m completely obsessed with winter sowing. I mean, seriously, I talk about it all the time. I’m almost finished with winter sowing for the season, and I’m so happy to show you all […]


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