Advertisements

Tag: kentucky

Growing Love in a Mist Nigella Flowers – Cut Flower Garden

Growing Love in a Mist Nigella Flowers – Cut Flower Garden

CHECK OUT OUR SOAP SUBSCRIPTION AND 50% OFF SALE! CLICK HERE! I’ll be the first to admit that love-in-a-mist has never been one of my “must have” flowers. Having never grown it before, I didn’t really know what to expect the first time I grew […]

Advertisements
Planting Anemone Coronaria in Zone 6/7 – Cut Flower Farm Gardening for Beginners

Planting Anemone Coronaria in Zone 6/7 – Cut Flower Farm Gardening for Beginners

Much like ranunculus, I can’t help but feel like anemone coronaria is yet another flower that can lead to quite the frustration for home gardeners and amateur flower farmers. The first time I planted anemones was a complete failure. I planted in the spring, and […]

Plants for an Abundant Fall Vegetable Garden Harvest – How to Plant a Fall Garden – Gardening for Beginners Growing Organic Food at Home

Plants for an Abundant Fall Vegetable Garden Harvest – How to Plant a Fall Garden – Gardening for Beginners Growing Organic Food at Home

Fall has long been one of my favorite seasons. While I do love the heat and excitement of the summer, it is nice to slow down and relax when the temperatures begin to cool off. This sentiment also applies to the happenings in the garden, as well. Late summer and fall is the perfect time to begin thinking about planting broccoli, kale, and other delicious garden vegetables that thrive when matured in cool weather.

When considering what vegetable plants to plant in the fall garden, you’ll want to look for varieties of crops that demonstrate some tolerance to cold. Since these plants will grow throughout the fall (and sometimes into winter), it is very possible that many of these plants will experience frost and sometimes, snow. Ability to withstand frost is the key to selecting the right plants for your garden.

Starting Seeds – 

Ideally, most seeds should be started quite some time before the average first frost date for your area – usually about 12 weeks. This number can be calculated easily online by searching for your average first frost date, then subtracting the weeks. More specific numbers can also be achieved by subtracting the days to maturity for the specific crop your have decided to grow. When doing this, I like to subtract one or two additional weeks, just in case the weather is being especially unpredictable. 

While starting your own seeds can be a little intimidating for beginner growers, it really is the best option for those hoping for bountiful harvests. Unfortunately, it is very seldom that transplants for fall crops can be found at garden centers or home improvement stores. Personally, I think that is a major disappointment! Here in my zone, the taste of crops allowed to mature in cool weather is beyond compare to their summer counterparts.

When starting seeds for the fall garden, the options are limitless. Though many growers choose to start the seeds indoors, others may opt to direct sow them in place. In my garden, I choose to start the seeds outdoors in seed trays. This is mainly due to a lack of space in the garden AND inside the house. Starting the seeds in trays outdoors works well, as long as the trays are not allowed to dry out and are sheltered from the sun during the hottest parts of the day. Blazing hot broccoli plants are not happy broccoli plants. 

What I’m Planting This Year – 

In the past, I’ll admit, I have been less than enthusiastic about starting plants for the fall garden. After all, most cold hardy crops are brassicas and various greens. Who would ever be excited about cauliflower!? Over the years, as I have worked on my eating habits, I have genuinely found myself enjoying these luscious salad greens quite a bit more.

Want to check out what’s happening in my fall garden? Check out the video below!

WATCH 500+ FREE GARDEN VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL! CLICK HERE!

Here’s what I’m planting this year (Affiliate Links) –

‘Red Chantenay’ Carrots

‘Oxheart’ Carrots

‘Trigger’ Crisphead Lettuce

‘Palla di Fuoco Rossa’ Radicchio

‘Melissa’ Cabbage

‘Snow Crown’ Cauliflower

‘Vates’ Collards

‘Nero di Toscana’ Kale

‘Red Rubine’ Brussels Sprouts

‘Northern Lights’ Swiss Chard

‘Chioggia’ Beets

‘Waltham 29’ Broccoli

That’s it! It looks like the entire backyard is going to be filled with veggies this fall! I guess I’ll need to find another place to plant my flowers! I would love to hear what you’re planting this fall – let me know in the comments below. Hope you’re having a great day!

I have no idea what I'm doing

NEW TO GARDENING? GET THE FREE 120 PAGE E-BOOK NOW – CLICK HERE!

GET FREE GARDEN TIPS AND SHARE PHOTOS – JOIN OUR FACEBOOK GARDEN CLUB – CLICK HERE!

IMG_0861

WANT TO SUPPORT FRESHCUTKY? WE MAKE HANDMADE ARTISAN SOAP –

JOIN THE SOAP OF THE MONTH CLUB  – FREE SHIPPING! CLICK HERE!

CLICK HERE TO VISIT OUR ETSY SHOP!

June Garden Update – Cut Flower Garden and Vegetable Gardening for Beginners – Growing Flowers from Seed

June Garden Update – Cut Flower Garden and Vegetable Gardening for Beginners – Growing Flowers from Seed

I know I say it every single time that I write one of these, but I seriously can’t believe how much everything has grown since the last time I posted! Let’s take a quick look around, shall we? Here’s a look at the entire garden. […]

June Garden Update – Week 2 – Growing Flowers from Seed + Vegetable Gardening for Beginners

June Garden Update – Week 2 – Growing Flowers from Seed + Vegetable Gardening for Beginners

Hey, everyone! It feels like it’s been awhile since I’ve posted something here. I’ve noticed that this has quickly turned into a place that I keep my garden notes. Eventually, when things settle down, I’d like to make more posts that mention “how-to” do things […]

Cut Flower Garden Jar Arrangement – Snapdragons and Pansies – Growing Flowers from Seed

Cut Flower Garden Jar Arrangement – Snapdragons and Pansies – Growing Flowers from Seed

What’s that?!?! Are those SNAPDRAGONS?!?! If you’ve been around the blog for awhile, you’ll know that I’m absolutely terrible at growing snapdragons. I’ve tried several times, but something always go wrong. Not this year! I grew actual snapdragons – look, there’s even photographic evidence!

This variety isn’t one of those fancier hybrids, but rather came from a package labeled as ‘Tall Mix’. I think I bought it from Baker Creek. I’m so happy with the colors and the size of the blooms. Okay, who am I kidding? I’m so happy that they even bloomed. Here’s hoping that I will be able to duplicate this success next year.

I couldn’t resist taking a picture of my pretty snapdragons with some sunshine and a lens flare.

Using my snapdragons, I quickly made this cut flower arrangement from the cutting patch. There’s honestly not much blooming right now, so grabbing a few odds and ends was a little bit of a challenge. I think it turned out rather lovely, still.

‘White Wonder’ feverfew from Renee’s Garden remain to be one of my absolute favorite small flowers – both when used in a vase and when growing in the landscrape. The huge sprays are so pretty and attention grabbing. The only downside that I’ve noticed is that the can smell a little “skunky” when they’re wet. Not a fan of that, at all. 

The ‘Orange Sun’ pansies are also still blooming. I really like using pansies as cut flowers this time of year, as their stems are the perfect length for making jars full of flowers. There’s something about them that makes me feel carefree and happy. It might just be because they’re bright yellow though, I’m not sure. 

I think this flower jar would have looked really nice if I had just omitted the snapdragons; and used only the greens, yellows, and whites. You can see above, I also used a little bit of sweet basil for foliage-filler. I love adding basil to flower arrangements. It very seldom wilts, and it’s so easy to grow when the weather is blazing hot in the summer.

Last, but not least, I added a few alpine strawberry leaves. Though not very large, I think the shape offers a nice contrast. What do you think? I’d love to hear all about it in the comments! Thanks so much for reading!

Pansies in the Garden for Super Cute Jar Posies – Cut Flower Arrangement

Pansies in the Garden for Super Cute Jar Posies – Cut Flower Arrangement

So, I’ll admit – I didn’t know what to call this post. For some reason, calling something “super cute” doesn’t seem like the most professional thing to do – but then again, I’m not a professional. That means these pansies are officially being classified as […]

Winter Sowing Results / End of April Garden Update – Cut Flowers and Vegetables

Winter Sowing Results / End of April Garden Update – Cut Flowers and Vegetables

Even though it’s still raining and I still haven’t had the opportunity to plant a lot of my leafy green vegetables, we’re quickly approaching the last frost date for my garden. Here, I generally use the date of May 5th as my frost-free date – […]

Johnny-Jump-Ups Are Actually Pretty Adorable – Growing Violas

Johnny-Jump-Ups Are Actually Pretty Adorable – Growing Violas

When I planted johnny-jump-ups last season, I wasn’t exactly sold on the idea that I would like them. In general, I tend to always gravitate towards things that are big and showy. However, I bought them in hopes that they would reward me with even more early season color. For me, winter is a really difficult time to get through, and honestly, I need all the help that I can get!

As it turns out, the whole process was really easy. I started the viola seeds around mid July. Simply, I sowed the seeds into a container in the house and then covered the container with a plastic garbage bag that would not let any light in. I left it at a cool room temperature in my kitchen. I made sure that the seed starting medium remained consistently moist. Voila! Violas! <— See what I did there, lol. 

After the seeds had germinated, I simply moved the container outside for my seedlings to continue growing until I was able to find a place to transplant them. Since the summer temperatures were still pretty hot, I found them a place with nice afternoon shade. 

After temperatures began to cool, I found lovely place to transplant the viola seedlings among the biennial flowers that I had also started. There they were covered with a low tunnel for the winter once the frost started to arrive. 

It’s important to note here that I didn’t cover these with a low tunnel because I was worried about them. The reason is that I was protecting SOMETHING ELSE within that same flower bed. I’ve seen quite a few people mention online that these little johnny jumps are quite cold tolerant, and I absolutely believe it.

I was seriously surprised to see that these flowers bloomed all winter long inside the low tunnel. Considering how incredibly cold this winter has been – I’m thoroughly impressed! Amazing. The cold tolerance alone is enough to make me want to plant these every season! 

Even though I made the choice to sow these seeds indoors as a means to germinate them, my garden instinct (and other people online) tell me that they respond well to being sown outside in the fall and overwintered for spring bloom. Perhaps that’s something I’ll definitely have to try this coming season.

Thank you so much for taking the time to check out this post. It means a lot to me. I’d love to hear all about your experiences growing johnny jumps or other violas down in the comments below! I hope you’re having a wonderful day!

EASY, NO TILL GARDENING (13)

Growing Bachelor’s Buttons from Seed – Hardy Annual Flower Favorites – Growing Flowers from Seed – Gardening for Beginners

Growing Bachelor’s Buttons from Seed – Hardy Annual Flower Favorites – Growing Flowers from Seed – Gardening for Beginners

Bachelor’s buttons will always be among one of my top five absolute favorite flowers. Now, I do realize that might sound a little odd. The plants don’t exactly have the show-stopping power of the likes of hydrangeas or roses – so what makes them so […]


%d bloggers like this: