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Tag: phlox

January Hardy Annual Flowers and Hoophouse Update – Cut Flower Farm

January Hardy Annual Flowers and Hoophouse Update – Cut Flower Farm

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Large Scale Winter Sowing Experiment – Starting Flower and Vegetable Seeds Without Grow Lights

Large Scale Winter Sowing Experiment – Starting Flower and Vegetable Seeds Without Grow Lights

A few seasons ago, a brief introduction to the winter sowing method completely changed the way I garden. Without the need for grow lights or fancy seed starting setups, it is truly a way for those of us with tiny garden budgets to grow something […]

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Continuing the Winter Sowing Method – More Plantings for the Low Tunnel

Since my last post, my winter sowing has moved into full swing. This time of year, the process of starting all my flower seeds is such an exciting one. On one hand, I’m super eager to watch things start to grow. On the other, I’m always worried that absolutely nothing will grow and that things will be a complete failure. I guess that’s just my personality – either everything is great or everything is awful. Lol.

Today, I’m winter sowing some plants that I absolutely know will be successful. First to sow is bachelor’s buttons. I was able to find a packet of tall red bachelor’s buttons for just .99 cents – of course, I couldn’t resist. Bachelor’s buttons are an extremely cold tolerant annual flower in my garden. I usually plant these seeds in the fall and the bachelor button seedlings overwinter without protection, and then bloom in the following spring/early summer. On years that are exceptionally cold, I might lose some of the seedlings, but the rate at which these overwinter is usually pretty great. In fact, it is always one of the first hardy annual flowers that I suggest people try to grow.

I’m also sowing ‘Cherry Caramel’ phlox flowers again. I’ve grown phlox before in the past, and the more I learn about it – the more I’m beginning to think that I will need to grow these over winter in a low tunnel to get the best bloom possible. The good news for people with milder summer temperatures than me is that these annual phlox respond extremely well to the winter sowing method. It seems that the early season fluctuating temperatures really help with great germination rates. These packet from Baker Creek apparently has really crappy germination. It would have been nice to know that before I ordered them. Not to mention that was the rate from way back in April – but whatever. Hopefully, some of this packet will germinate. Who knows?

Statice is another of the more hardy annual flowers that does extremely well from the winter sowing method. In fact, the winter sowing method is the only way that I’ve ever germinated this seed. I tried making a fall planting this year, but the germination rate was absolutely terrible (even with cold treatment in the fridge). This tells me that they likely benefit from a combination of moisture and fluctuating temperatures that naturally happens with the winter sowing method. Anyhow, these are also super easy to transplant.

I also planted some spinach up in some cell trays. In general, spinach is not that great for starting in trays because their roots don’t really like to be disturbed. I find that growing each seed in their own cell makes the roots less likely to tangle and make transplant too difficult. Winter sowing spinach works great. This, in tandem with a direct sowing in the fall, will allow me to have spinach as long as possible (which isn’t very long) in my garden. Once the spring weather arrives, spinach season is practically over.

Gaillardia is another perennial flower that germinates really well when grown using the winter sowing method. For these, I always make sure to surface sow the seeds, as it seems that exposure to a little bit of light really seems to help get the highest germination rate possible. I can’t remember the name of the variety that I bought this year, but I do know that it’s a mix of double flowers. Hopefully, they’ll look really nice.

Last, but not least, I sowed some more herbs for the garden. This included some rosemary, sage, and even a little thyme. Winter sowing makes growing herbs from seed so insanely easy (at least here in my garden).

That’s really about it for this post! Thank you so much for taking the time to read it. I would love to hear all about what you’re growing in the comments below – have you ever used the winter sowing method before? What did you grow? I hope you’re having a great day!

March Week One Update

March Week One Update

Hi Lovelies, Brace yourselves! This post has a lot of pictures. Just a quick peek at ¬†nearly everything¬†that’s going on right now! Let’s all just hope that this warmer weather will keep on coming our way! Not pictured is the progress on the dahlia tubers […]

February Week 4 Update – Germination Celebration, lol.

February Week 4 Update – Germination Celebration, lol.

Hi Lovelies, The week 4 update is a little early, but I probably won’t have internet access for the next few days – so I wanted to get these posted now! All of the seedlings below have been planted using the winter sowing method in […]

An Update on a Sunny Day

An Update on a Sunny Day

Hi Lovelies,

Well, today looks like it’s going to be one of the last days before the weather turns gross and cold again. It’s sunny, it’s 60F. For whatever reason, I don’t feel like singing songs and wearing shorts yet, though. Anyhow, just wanted to quickly share some captures from the hoophouse and to update everyone on the progress of the winter sowing. Have I mentioned yet that I love winter sowing? LOVE IT. It doesn’t matter that I don’t have money for seed trays. It doesn’t matter that I don’t have money to set up a “proper” propagation area. I’m starting from scratch, and for the first time in a long time, I have that sense that “everything is going to be okay.” Don’t forget to enter the GIVEAWAY by visiting my Instagram or Facebook – @freshcutky or facebook.com/freshcutky. There are four prizes being offered by Botanical Interests. The deluxe gift box ($91 dollar value!), veggie gift box, sprout kit gift box, and pollinator gift box! That’s about it, much love!

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I love seeing the hoop house coming to life! I’m so excited!
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Some people take pictures of their kids. Other people take pictures of their flowers. Just sayin’, lol.
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Why is it so hard to capture the true color these! It’s driving me crazy. That center is much more blue/purple tinted than it shows.
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I’ve not edited these photos in any way. I have no idea why it looks so velvety and luxurious. LOL.
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If I wasn’t paying attention, I may have mistaken this cutie for a rose.
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This one got a little wonky from the cold.
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Caramel Cherry Phlox making an appearance for the first time!
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Potomac Mix Snapdragons
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Generic Tall Snapdragons
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Pixie Delight Annual Lupine
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Bright Brilliant Quinoa
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Monstrosum Mix Strawflower – these are the seeds that were “infested with insects” that I mentioned previously.
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I’ve germinated enough sweet annie to plant like three acres. I may be exaggerating a little, but I have no idea what to do with all this stuff.
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Quartet Mix Stock – First try growing this, hence the small batch.
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It’s almost time to uncover the dusty miller during the warm sunny days. Germination was really nice.
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My yard is literally covered in “garbage”. But, that garbage has some really precious cargo inside!
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Even the Rudbeckia Triloba is happy in its container. This is the first time I’ve had such good germination. That makes me happy. They’re kind of hard to see, you’ll have to trust me on this one I guess.
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Here she is! The first ranunculus buds have formed!! I’m going to be a very happy person, very soon!

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