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  • Cut Flower Seed Starting Update

    I talk about seed starting a lot. Obviously, there can’t be a garden unless we’re able to get the plants into the ground. Though I’ve always been a big supporter of direct sowing, I find that I like starting seeds into trays more and more with each season that passes. This season is no exception to this. Normally, I would use the winter sowing method to start all of my seeds – but this year has been weird. Since this spring has been extremely cool and very wet, I’m roughly three weeks behind in starting the garden. Since the last frost date has already passed, I simply started these seed…

  • Winter Sowing Low Tunnel Setup for Seed Starting

    Now that we’re almost into February, it’s time to start thinking about planting seeds for the next growing season. The first seeds that I’ll sow include my perennial flowers and my hardy annual flowers. Since I don’t have a big grow light setup, I’ll need to construct an unheated low tunnel specifically for seed starting using the winter sowing method. The first step in the process is to spread plastic on the ground. Ideally, this would be a piece of my black landscape fabric. However, all of it is current in use in the garden. It may be a dark and dreary day right now, but conditions in the tunnel…

  • What I’m Winter Sowing in January –

    Since I’ve started posting about seed starting and winter sowing, one of the most common questions I get is “what do I winter sow and when?” This year, I’m attempting to help answer that question by making a series of posts showing what plants I’m actually planting each month. I generally start the winter sowing process around January 21st. This is around the same time that the day length in my growing zone surpasses 10 hours. My last frost date is usually around the first week of May. This means that there is still tons of cold weather left in the season. Therefore, I’ll need to focus on plants that…

  • Seed Starting Tips: Soaking and Stratification for Better Flower Seed Germination

    It’s nearly October, and that means one very important thing – it’s time to begin preparing for the spring garden. While I know it seems somewhat odd to start preparations this soon, it’s actual crucial in terms of creating the best garden possible. After all, now is the time to start planting fall flowering bulbs, planting biennial flowers, and sowing hardy annual flowers. Many hardy annual and biennial flowers are unique in their ability to grow well during the coolest portions of the growing season. This is especially surprising here in zone 6b/7. I feel that my garden receives fairly cold temperatures in the winter, so I’m always surprised to…

  • Winter Sowing Results for Frost Tender Annual Flowers and Vegetables

    This winter sowing season is finally coming to a close. If you’ve been following along here on the blog, you know that I did something a little different this year. Instead of using bottles, I decided to start seeds in trays using an unheated low tunnel. As you can see from the photos below, this method was a huge success. I’m so glad to be able to share it with you! Overall, I had a great experience growing in trays. In fact, in sowing frost tender annuals, germination occurred in every single tray. However, some trays did have a little bit of grass pop up. I have no idea how…

  • Winter Sowing Petunia Flowers

    Winter sowing petunia seeds is a great way to grow a lot of flowers at a little cost. Let’s face it, bedding plants can be really expensive. Growing from seed not only allows us to save a little money, but it also gives a great selection when choosing which seeds to grow. The process of winter sowing petunia seeds is generally the same as winter sowing any other plant. Since petunia flowers are sensitive to frost, I usually wait until mid March before starting the winter sowing process. By March, temperatures have started to warm enough to trigger germination, however, it is still a solid month away from my last…

  • Winter Sowing Impatiens Flowers for the Flower Bed

    Winter sowing impatiens is a great way to add a lot of appeal to flower beds for a very low cost. While many bedding plants can be easily purchased at the home improvement store, the cost can definitely add up quickly. Luckily for those of us on a budget, the winter sowing method is a great way to great the most for your money. To winter sow impatiens, I usually wait until mid March here in zone 6b/7. By March, the weather has started to warm and the days have gotten longer. This allows for the consistent germination of impatiens seeds. Here in my yard, the impatiens are definitely sensitive…

  • Winter Sowing Cleome Flowers in the Cut Flower Garden

    In my experience, it seems that cleome is one of those flowers that people can have strong opinions about. Before I started growing it, I had no clue what the plant even looked like. However, now it’s an ornamental flower that I really, really love. I personally don’t use this one as a cut flower, but rather enjoy the height and color that it brings to the flower patch. Though I had heard that this plant is somewhat thorny, the first thing that I noticed was the scent. To my nose, this plant smells straight up like some kind of funky smelling skunk. I imagine if you’re the type of…

  • Winter Sowing Pepper Seeds – Seed Starting

    Ever since I started winter sowing pepper seeds, I haven’t gone back to starting the seeds indoors. When I first started gardening, I assumed that starting these seeds under grow lights was the only option. My first couple trys at grow pepper seeds was an absolute disaster. In the end, I had little to show for it, aside from potting soil stains in my living room carpet. Fast forward a few seasons, and winter sowing peppers is my jam! Like most other plants, peppers can be started in winter sowing milk jugs or soda bottles. Here in my zone 6b/7 garden, I generally begin the process of winter sowing pepper…

  • Spinach Seeds

    Winter Sowing Spinach in Zone 6b/7

    Winter Sowing Spinach Winter sowing spinach is awesome! I feel like I’ve mentioned it a thousand times, but I absolutely love spinach. As someone who doesn’t have the healthiest of eating habits, spinach is delightful. From the texture to the inoffensive taste, spinach is a great choice for me and my journey to making better choices. Depending upon where you live, the process of growing spinach can be a little bit tricky. People will mild climates can likely plant it throughout the year. However, here in my hot summer garden spinach is not happy. Here in zone 7ish, the general advice seems to be that spinach should be planted in…