Advertisements

Tag: winter sowing for beginners

Large Scale Winter Sowing Experiment – Starting Flower and Vegetable Seeds Without Grow Lights

Large Scale Winter Sowing Experiment – Starting Flower and Vegetable Seeds Without Grow Lights

A few seasons ago, a brief introduction to the winter sowing method completely changed the way I garden. Without the need for grow lights or fancy seed starting setups, it is truly a way for those of us with tiny garden budgets to grow something […]

Advertisements
A New Season of Winter Sowing

A New Season of Winter Sowing

It’s finally here! Yet another season of winter sowing. If you’re not familiar with winter sowing, a quick search of either this blog or my YouTube channel will definitely yield some results. Winter sowing has quickly become one of my favorite gardening techniques. In fact, […]

2017 Winter Sowing Results

2017 Winter Sowing Results

Hi Lovelies!

IMG_1072

It’s definitely been awhile. I’ll admit, I really hate saying that because it makes me realize just how much I really do neglect the blog. I always keep meaning to finally sit down and write up a post, but it always seems like a million other things that I need to do suddenly take precedence. Sorry about that, folks.

IMG_0922

Anywho, this is a post I’ve been meaning to finally sit down and finish for at least a couple weeks – this year’s winter sowing results.

IMG_1078

If you’re unfamiliar with what winter sowing is, I’ve already got a post in which I prepare containers and talk at a little more length. You can find it by clicking here!

IMG_1004

I also have already published a rather extensive list of flowers that I began by winter sowing last year. You can find that by clicking here. If I remember correctly, I go into detail about the success and failure of around 50 different flower varieties that I winter sowed into containers. If I had a different experience this year, I’ll also go ahead and include them in my list in this year’s post. I hope that made sense….

IMG_0971

Hurry up, already! Tell me about what you winter sowed this year!

IMG_0958

This year was quite different than last year. Much to my surprise, the winter was relatively warm and short. I imagine that this may have helped/harmed various seedlings in different ways, but nonetheless, these are my findings:

**Indicates sensitivity to frost

  1. Feverfew – Winter sown in January and February. Excellent germination. Transplanted into the garden before last frost had passed.
  2. Monarda – Winter sown in February. Poor germination around 50%. Will definitely try again, perhaps at a later planting date.
  3. Salvia coccinea – Winter sown in January. Poor germination around 30%. Will try again at a later planting date.
  4. Salvia horminum – Winter sown in January and February. Excellent germination. Transplanted into the garden before the last frost had passed.
  5. Snapdragons – Winter sown in January. Total failure. Previous winter sowings have been very successful with snapdragons. I believe the failure was caused by inconsistent moisture in containers. Will definitely try again next year.
  6. Pansies – Winter sown in January. Excellent germination. Transplanted into the garden before the last frost date had passed. Flowers are currently in bloom.
  7. Cathedral Bells/Cup and Saucer Vine** – Winter sown in February and the end of March. Seeds in February rotted in the container. Total failure. March sowing was extremely successful. Excellent germination. The higher temperatures seemed to be the key to success, despite the instructions on the packet. I’m really, really excited about growing this one!
  8. Hibiscus/Roselle**- Winter sown at the end of March. Last year was a failure. However, this year had excellent results. Seeds are VERY sensitive to rot. Do NOT soak seeds. Make sure medium is evenly moist, but not too wet. Will continue to winter sow these, as they need an extended season.
  9. Quinoa – Winter sown in January. Excellent germination. Do not transplant well. Total loss after transplant. Likely will not winter sow again.
  10. Sweet Peppers** – Pre-sprouted at the end of March and then placed in winter sowing containers. Excellent success rate. Requires cover. Very frost sensitive.
  11. Tomatoes** – Pre-sprouted at the end of March and then placed in winter sowing containers. Excellent success rate. Requires cover. Very frost sensitive.
  12. Celosia** – Winter sown in March. Excellent germination. Previous sowings in February resulted in failure.
  13. Morning Glory** – Winter sown in March. Excellent germination. Previous sowings in February resulted in failure. Warmer weather helped germination. Also, sensitive to moisture and prone to rot. Do not soak.
  14. Lettuce – Winter sown in January and February. Excellent germination. Transplanted into the garden before the last frost had passed.
  15. Alpine Strawberries – Winter sown in January. Good germination rate. Slow growing. Cold hardy, no trouble tolerating frost. Transplanted into herb garden containers.
  16. Scarlet Flax – Winter sown in January. Excellent germination rate. Extremely fast growing. Was not able to transplant into the garden fast enough before plants went to seed in their containers. I plan on trying over winter these plants in the fall, instead.
  17. Annual Phlox – Winter sown in January and February. Excellent germination. Seem to benefit from cold and temperature fluctuation. Planted out into the garden before the last frost date had passed. Will try to over winter these plants this fall.
  18. Cotton** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination. Will continue to winter sow these, as they need an extended season.
  19. Peanuts** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination. Will continue to winter sow these, as they need an extended season.
  20. Leeks – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination rate. Very easy to separate.
  21. Onions – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination rate. Very easy to separate.
  22. Spinach – Winter sown at the end of January. Around 70% germination. Don’t seem to like being transplanted. I will most likely just direct sow the seeds in the future.
  23. Orach – Winter sown in February. Excellent germination. Very fast growing. May be easier to direct sow as soon as soil is workable. Will try to over winter these in the fall.
  24. Shiso/Perilla**(?) – Winter sown at the end of February and March. Excellent germination. Somewhat sensitive to transplanting. However, the germination rate was much better compared to the seeds that were direct sown. Will definitely winter sow these again. Looking forward to seeing these bloom.
  25. Broccoli – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination. Easy to transplant. Will definitely continue to winter sow in the future.
  26. Cauliflower – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination. Easy to transplant. Will definitely continue to winter sow in the future. IMG_1040
  27. Brussels Sprouts – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination. Easy to transplant. Will definitely continue to winter sow in the future.
  28. Kale – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination. Easy to transplant. Will definitely continue to winter sow in the future.
  29. Artichokes – Winter sown at the end of February. Excellent germination, though the seeds are sensitive to rot. Ensure that medium is moist, but not too wet. Prolonged cold also caused problems in the past. Do not soak the seeds. Transplanted well. Artichokes need a period of cool weather to trigger flowering, hopefully winter sowing achieved this.
  30. Celery – Winter sown in February. Excellent germination. Transplanted into the garden before last frost date had passed.
  31. Tomatillos** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination. Extremely fast growing. Will most likely direct sow in the future.
  32. Wheat – Winter sown in January. Excellent germination. Very robust and easy to transplant. It’s definitely easier to direct sow as soon as soil can be worked, but winter sowing is a viable option if the soil is an issue early on.
  33. Basil** –  Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination. Easy to transplant. I have so much basil that I don’t even have enough space to plant it all.
  34. Chamomile – Winter sown in January. Excellent germination. Very cold hardy. Small plants are difficult to transplant. May be easier to just direct sow as soon as the soil can be worked. Transplanted into the garden before the last frost has passed.
  35. Cilantro – Winter sown at the end of February. Excellent germination. Transplanted easily. Winter sown plants in the garden are healthier than those seeds which were direct sowed. IMG_0728
  36. Dill – Winter sown at the end of February. Excellent germination. Transplanted easily. May be easier to direct sow as soon as the soil can be worked.
  37. Lavender – Winter sown in January. Excellent germination (at least for lavender, 14/20 seeds). Very healthy and fragrant seedlings transplanted into herb container after the danger of frost had passed. Really excited about this success!
  38. Mint – Winter sown in January. Excellent germination. Easy to transplant. I seriously have so much mint, I don’t even know what I’m going to do with it.
  39. Ageratum**(?) – Winter sown in January. Ageratum containers were a failure this year. Last year’s were very successful. I’m not sure what caused the issue this year.
  40. Bupleurum – Winter sown in January. Very poor germination for the second year in a row. I will not be winter sowing it again.
  41. Calendula – Winter sown in February and March. Excellent germination. Fast growing plants.
  42. Cosmos** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination. Quickly began to outgrow their winter sowing containers. Though these plants are easy to direct sow, I really enjoy having healthy transplants.
  43. Wild Dagga** – Winter sown at the end of March. 2/10 seed germination. I don’t know much about this plant at all.
  44. Shasta Daisy – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination. Healthy and hearty transplants.
  45. Flowering Cabbage – Winter sown in January and February. Excellent germination. Transplanted into the garden before the last frost date had passed.
  46. Gaillardia – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination. Healthy and hearty transplants. IMG_1052
  47. Globe Amaranth** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination rate. Easy to transplant.
  48. Heliotrope**(?) – Winter sown at the end of March. 60% germination rate. I know very little about this plant. The seedlings seem to be very slow growing, so I’ve planted them in a container to watch them closer. Will try again next year, perhaps winter sowing them earlier.
  49. Marigolds** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination and extremely easy to transplant. Nearly outgrowing their containers before being planted out into the garden.
  50. Nicotiana**(?) – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination and extremely easy to transplant.
  51. Nasturtiums – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination and extremely easy to transplant. Last year’s failure was due to rotting seeds. Be careful not to plant too soon to avoid prolonged periods of cold. Also, keep medium evenly moist. Do not soak seeds before planting into winter sowing containers.
  52. Rudbeckias – Winter sown at the end of January and February. Excellent germination. Healthy and hearty transplants.
  53. Statice – Winter sown in February. Excellent germination rate and easy to transplant before the last frost has passed.
  54. Strawflower – Winter sown in February. Excellent germination rate and easy to transplant before the last frost has passed.
  55. Scented Stocks – Winter sown in February. Excellent germination rate and easy to transplant before the last frost has passed.
  56. Sweet Annie – Winter sown in February. Excellent germination rate and easy to transplant before the last frost has passed. Very fragrant!IMG_0763
  57. Sweet Peas (Lathyrus odorata) – Winter sown in February. Excellent germination rate and easy to transplant before the last frost has passed. Previous failures were the result of rotted seeds. Keep evenly moist, but not wet. Do not soak seeds before planting to containers.
  58. Tithonia** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination. Germinating in winter sowing bottles has proved more successful that direct sowing. I will continue to winter sow.
  59. Zinnia** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination.
  60. Indigo** – Winter sown at the end of March. Excellent germination.
  61. Verbena – Total failure. Sown at the end of March. Containers completely dried out for over a week – totally my own fault.

That’s it! I hope that this giant list was somehow helpful. Thanks for taking the time to read, and of course, don’t forget to check out the YouTube channel if you haven’t already. It would really mean a lot to me – simply search for “freshcutky”. Bye! 🙂

 

 

Winter Sowing Results / Transplanting into the Garden!

Winter Sowing Results / Transplanting into the Garden!

Hi Lovelies, Wow, I seriously can’t believe that it’s already that time of year. While the weather has certainly been all over the place – it’s time to transplant some of my winter sowing containers into the ground! Now, obviously there’s still a chance of […]

I’m back!

I’m back!

Hi Lovelies, Oh my! It’s been awhile, hasn’t it? With the growing season right around the corner, I’m happy to say that one of my goals for the season is to get back into the habit of blogging (in addition to posting regular content all […]

February 2016: Week One Update

February 2016: Week One Update

Hi Lovelies,

feb.wk1.update 055
Hello Mr. Hyacinth! Looking mighty fine!

First and foremost, let me apologize to everyone who left a comment on the last post and I didn’t get a chance to respond. I’ve been having major technical difficulties over here, which I have hopefully resolved.

feb.wk1.update 035
Anemones and ranunculus and also, some weeds. Oh well.

Now that I’ve done a lot of winter sowing, I feel like the season has started – and I’m extremely excited about it. This winter has been a lot sunnier than normal, and I can only hope that the trend continues. My goal at the moment is to write an update at least once a week – but we’ll see how that goes. Honestly, I’m not even sure if anyone actually reads this things. Oh well, worst case scenario is that I’ve got some pretty good notes to look back on in the future.

feb.wk1.update 056
Tulips!

Today, we’ll take a look at a few things that are growing in the garden. Have you noticed that I still call it a “garden” even though I’m actively working to make it into a larger scale thing.

First, we’ll take a look at the anemones – mainly because they’re gorgeous and currently my favorite thing. If you don’t remember, I planted the corms back in the first week of October and planted them into the hoophouse for overwintering.

feb.wk1.update 030
Black eyed beauty anemones. It’s out of focus, but I’m just going to pretend like that was an artistic choice.

Next we’ll take a peek at the winter sowing containers that are already growing. The first round of winter sowing was started outside on January 16th. Within a few weeks, things are “magically” growing. This basically makes me want to happy-dance in the middle of the street. I’ve tried to grow many of these things before and completely failed at it, so the fact that I can just stick some seeds in a milk jug and then they grow – it makes me so excited. Maybe I do have a green thumb after all? Let’s keep our fingers crossed!

feb.wk1.update 028
I think this one is ‘Mr. Fokker’ Anemone.

Here’s what’s “come up” so far. To be oddly specific, by “come up” I mean that tap roots have emerged from the seed coat. Some of these don’t have their cotyledons opened just yet – but it’s on the way!

feb.wk1.update 020
I honestly don’t know which type this is. Maybe one of the red ones? It’s so hard to get these to show up on camera as their “true color”

January 31st: Quinoa emerges

feb.wk1.update 009
Quinoa

February 1st: Signs of Stock, Lupine, Poppy, and Sweet Annie

feb.wk1.update 008
Lupine
feb.wk1.update 012
Sweet Annie
feb.wk1.update 011
Stocks

 

February 2nd: First Tricolor Salvia and Monstrosum Strawflower

feb.wk1.update 013
Tricolor Salvia
feb.wk1.update 010
I got a note in the mail about this package of strawflower being “infested with insects”. I emailed for more info and found out that it was possible that the germination could be impact. This definitely didn’t seem to be a problem fortunately.

February 3rd: Sunset Statice and Cherry Phlox

February 4th: Snapdragons

February 5th: Dusty Miller

feb.wk1.update 024
Ugh! I just love the look of these ‘Bordeaux’. The petals are like velvet!

As you can see, there’s quite a bit happening here on the daily! I’ll be sure to keep everyone updated as things start happening! As always, feel free to leave any comments below! I’d love to hear from you!! You can also watch the YouTube update if you want to see more pretty flowers!

 


%d bloggers like this: